Tag Archives: native plants

Broad-Leaved Stonecrop (Sedum spathulifolium)

broad leaved stonecrop, spatula-leaved, sedum spathulifolium,, pacific sedum, spoon-leaved, Colorado stonecrop, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

There it was, carpeting a cliff along the beach, one of the toughest plants I know.
Broad-Leaved Stonecrop.

The rain drains quickly, rinsing nutrients from the rocky soil.

  • Drought tolerant.
  • No need for feed.
  • A suitable candidate for planting on a green roof?
broad leaved stonecrop, spatula-leaved, sedum spathulifolium,, pacific sedum, spoon-leaved, Colorado stonecrop, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

It clings & dangles tenaciously, spreading when leaning stems touch ground  & sprout tiny roots.  If a piece breaks off, it’s determined to grow right where it lands.
Resolved.
Insistent.

broad leaved stonecrop, spatula-leaved, sedum spathulifolium,, pacific sedum, spoon-leaved, Colorado stonecrop, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

It seems content in shade.

In the full sun, the succulent, spatula-shaped leaves change from grey-green to red.
Who needs flowers when foliage is so decorative?

broad leaved stonecrop, spatula-leaved, sedum spathulifolium,, pacific sedum, spoon-leaved, Colorado stonecrop, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

But Sedum spathulifolium blooms, too — starry, bright yellow flowers in June.  Happy flowers.

I welcomed this coastal native into my garden a couple of years ago & am not disappointed.  Once placed in a gravelly patch, there’s not much to do with it.  I leave it alone, & so do the deer.  Score!

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Vancouver Groundcone – Boschniakia hookeri

It was high on my list to search for when we went camping with friends near Tofino in mid-May.  On the very first day, a young friend spotted one & brought it to my attention.  Score!

Vancouver groundcone, poque, corn cob, Boschniakia hookeri or Boschniakia strobilacea, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

It’s included in a list of ‘oddballs’ in my favorite field guide (Pojar & MacKinnon’s,  Plants Of The Pacific Northwest Coast.)   Who needs space aliens when we have mysteries like this on earth?  Is it a flower? Mushroom? Fungi?

Vancouver groundcone, poque, corn cob, Boschniakia hookeri or Boschniakia strobilacea, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

It’s called a Vancouver groundcone, & I can see why. The shape is so similar to a spruce cone standing upright.  Another name is Poque – an anglicized version of an indigenous word.

The unusual coloring indicates the groundcone lacks chlorophyll, & that means it can’t produce its own sugars. For food, it depends on others. It’s a parasitic plant, that taps nutrients from a salal and sometimes kinnikinnick.

Vancouver groundcone, poque, corn cob, Boschniakia hookeri or Boschniakia strobilacea, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

Both salal & kinnikinnick are common on our coastlines, so you’d think there’d be plenty of groundcones.  Perhaps there are more around, but I just haven’t been looking for them before?

Boschniakia hookeri grows in the moist (summer dry) coastal lowlands from Haida Gwaii in Central Coastal BC to  Northern California.  This is the first time I’ve ever seen any.  Go figure. Perhaps because they don’t need sunshine, they’re more common in shade, and more difficult to see?

Vancouver groundcone, poque, corn cob, Boschniakia hookeri or Boschniakia strobilacea, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

Aside from the yellow specimens I saw, Poque is found in a variety of colors from light yellow to brown to red or purple.  I suspect the yellow contrasts more with its environment, so is slightly easier to spot.  Once young WC showed me a few he’d spotted, I was able to find a few myself.

Now that I’ve checked this plant off my list, next up are more oddballs: Indian Pipe & Pinesaps.  Wish me luck!

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Playfair’s Camas In Bloom

Playfair Park Camas meadow, great camas, Camassia leichtlinii garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

There seems to be a buzz about Playfair Park this spring – and it’s not just the pollinators.  Several people have told me about how spectacular its Camas meadow is.  Of course, I had to check it out.

Playfair Park Camas meadow garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

I used to think that Camas meadows were beautiful gifts from Mother Nature, but it turns out she’s had a helping hand.  First Peoples farmed Camas for its food value.  Their work created more intense swaths of blue each spring.  Left untended these fruitful fields decline & are overtaken by more dominant species.

Playfair Park Camas meadow not restored garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

The Camas fields that are now Playfair Park succumbed to invasive grasses and introduced species.  Fortunately, volunteer Colleen OBrien came on the scene around 2010 with grand ideas, determination and stamina.  Over many years she’s gained the respect & cooperation of Saanich Parks, and their Pulling Together Program.

Great Camas, Camassia leichtlinii garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

The Common Camas bloom (Camas quamash) was pretty much over when I arrived, but the Great Camas (Camassia leichtlinii) was in full glory. I stopped in my tracks, slack-jawed.  It was so much more intense than I’d expected.

Seablush, shortspur, rosy plectritis, Plectritis congesta garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

What a joy to wander the paths of this paradise.  The over-the-top spectacle of the Camas is complemented by a striking variety of native companion plants:

  • Seablush, shortspur, rosy plectritis, Plectritis congesta garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
    photo by SVSeekins

    Seablush (Plectritis congesta) on rocky outcrops will grow happily at only ankle height. In a deep soil meadow, it reaches my knees in little explosions of pink joy.

  • Spring Gold, Lomatium utriculatum , common lomatium; fine-leaved lomatium garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
    photo by SVSeekins

    Spring Gold (Lomatium utriculatum) is the most recognized punch of color contrasting the Camas.  Even its ferny foliage contrasts the long straps of the Camas leaves.  The flat tops are great landing pads for pollinators to gather their wits until they decide where in this smorgasbord to head next.

  • Western Buttercup, Ranunculus occidentalis  garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
    photo by SVSeekins

    Western Buttercup (Ranunculus occidentalis) is the royal relative of the common creeping weed that is the bain of Seekers-Of-The-Perfect-Lawn.  This tall cousin also has a long bloom, but is welcome in my garden anytime.

  • Pacific Sanicle , Gamble weed, Pacific blacksnakeroot,  Sanicula crassicaulis, bloom, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
    photo by SVSeekins

    Pacific Sanicle (Sanicula crassicaulis) is a sturdy plant with palm-shaped leaves at its base & small pom-pom flowers on tall stems.   Its deep tap-root reaches moisture even when the summer drought kills off other plants.

  • Erythronium oregonum, white fawn lily, easter lily, Oregon Lily garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
    photo by SVSeekins

    Fawn Lily (Erythronium oregonum) blooms early, often with the first of the common Camas.  The white of the lily is a dramatic pop of contrast against the blue of the Camas.  By the time the taller Great Camas blooms, the fawn lily bloom is completed and it’s setting seed.

  • broad-leaved shooting star, Henderson's shooting star, mosquito bills, sailor caps bloom, Dodecatheon hendersonii, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
    photo by SVSeekins

    Shooting Stars (Dodecatheon hendersonii) are spectacular on their own with their delicate, cyclamen-like blooms.  They’re early bursts of color in rocky outcrops and path edges.  Once the taller Great Camas starts to bloom the Shooting Stars are easily overlooked.

  • Chocolate Lily, Chocolate Lily, checker lily, Fritillaria affinis  garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
    photo by SVSeekins

    Chocolate Lily  (Fritillaria affinis) is much larger in stature (knee-high) but its color is so muted that it’s also easily overlooked among the blooming Camas.  Sightings are few & far between.  SM spotted a patch of them beneath a tree & pointed them out, otherwise I’d have walked past unknowing.  Perhaps there are more around than I realized… perhaps not.

  • Yellow Montane Violet , Viola praemorsa garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
    photo by SVSeekins

    Yellow Montane Violet (Viola praemorsa)  is the darling of the meadow.  When Colleen first started the restoration, she was over the moon to find this endangered plant surviving.  It’s red-listed in BC. Now, because of her attention, others have taken up the cause & also work at restoring populations.

Yellow Montane Violet , Viola praemorsa garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

This piece of land has gone through many changes since colonization.  I’m glad that it was protected from more intense development.  In the 50’s the park was ear-marked for an arboretum, but that didn’t go beyond the incredible planting of rhododendron that’ve made the park famous for decades.

Great Camas, Camassia leichtlinii garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

I don’t think anyone really expected that those spring-blooming Rhododendrons would ever play second fiddle to this renewed native landscape.  Colonization meets nature in this lovely garden.

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