CU - Japanese anemone hupehensis var. japonica x hybrida bloom in August, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest

Embracing the Easy – Japanese Anemone

With waist height blooms twirling in the breeze, Japanese anemone caught my eye shortly after we moved into Richmond House.

Japanese Anemone japonica x hybrida blooming in November garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest,
photo by SVSeekins

A good patch grew close to the house foundations, but because of the drain tile project, it had to go.  Happily Japanese anemone transplant like a dream.  Their roots run along just under the soil, and don’t seem bothered about being split up a bit.

Japanese anemone japonica x hybrida in bloom, garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

Originally the deer seemed to leave the Japanese anemone alone, so I’ve experimented with several locations around the property.  In areas of deer congestion, the plants were grazed to about 8 inches high, and rarely bloomed.

Beside the busy bus stop, or along the crowded driveway, the deer leave Japanese anemone alone.  I’d say they’re salads of opportunity.

Japanese Anemone japonica x hybrida in drought, blooming in October garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest,
photo by SVSeekins

In their favor, Japanese anemone are hyper-resilient.

  •  After the deer eat them, they come right back.
  • After I shift them to a new location, they come right back.
  • There’s a very determined specimen that survived the soil being removed 8 feet deep during drain tile renovations.

Considering that plant is happy so close to the foundation wall, under the eaves where there’s no rainfall nor irrigation – – I’d say it qualifies as drought tolerant as well.

Japanese anemone japonica x hybrida blooming in September garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest,
photo by SVSeekins

It’s nice to have a plant that is happy in dry shade.  Dappled shade is great, but it struggles in deep shade.

The lengthy blooming period is a big plus in my books.  The pink blooms decorate the garden starting in July, and wrapping up in December.  That’s 6 months of color!

WS - Japanese anemone japonica x hybrida blooming in September garden Victoria, Vancouver Island, BC, Pacific Northwest
photo by SVSeekins

With all of these qualities, some might consider Japanese anemone an invasive.  I don’t really look at it that way.  Certainly it is determined, but I haven’t found it popping up in areas where I haven’t put it. My advice would be to consider carefully when choosing a planting site.

I may live to regret this.  Have you?

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